General
  • To support or introduce legislation, or amendments that are of real benefit to my electorate of Hinkler and Australian people in general.
  • Be diligent in working against corruption, malpractice and injustice within all areas of government, politics, business, the private sector and foreign affairs. All awareness of corruption, malpractice and injustice should be brought to the attention of authorities, parliament and the Australian public.
  • If elected to parliament I will ensure I put the interests of the general Australian citizens ahead of any corporate, commercial, political or personal interests. The interests of general Australian citizens must be placed ahead of any other interest both national and international.
  • If successfully elected to parliament I will conduct myself with honesty, integrity and professionalism at all times.
Our Australian Constitution
  • To ensure the Constitution of the Australian Commonwealth (i.e. Section 9 of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900) is adhered to from both a legal and moral sense.
  • Should the Australian people eventually vote to become a republic, our existing Constitution of the Australian Commonwealth, should be strengthened into a Bill Of Rights style document (that the citizens of Australia have input into and agree upon), and that it enshrines common law, civil rights and freedoms of the Australian people, that can only be subsequently changed by the will of the people at a referendum. This document should start with the premise that all  citizens have all freedoms to go about their personal lives and commercial trade activities without hindrance, as long as the intention or result is not to cause harm or ill-will to others.
    It must be enshrined that the citizens of Australia do have the ultimate control over it’s government and a mechanism to assert this control by majority vote.
  • Bring to the attention of parliament and the Australian people any inconsistencies in Commonwealth, State and local council laws that have been made in contrary to our overarching and binding Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900.
  • The Annotated Constitution of the Australian Commonwealth (1901) should be used as a formal reference guide to the history and practicality of the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900.
  • Recommend that a system be investigated where the citizens of Australian can instigate and mandate a referendum to have changes or additions made to the Constitution, or laws of the country, to better serve the will of the people.
  • We need to formally recognise and empower Australia’s indigenous people within the constitution and in our government. Australia was already populated by aboriginal people before European arrival and settlement. This needs to be officially accepted at a governance level.
Taxation
  • To strengthen our taxation legislation for all companies operating within Australia and ensure all companies, both national and multinational pay the full tax required here in Australia.
    It has been reported that between $6 – 20 Billion dollars is lost in taxation revenue by tax avoidance schemes by big national and multi-national companies. This is money that these companies have made by selling goods and services to Australians, or selling Australian resources. This tax revenue belongs to the Australian people.
  • To make sure a majority of the money received from taxing certain activity or products goes into funds used to benefit those areas and to the people who utilise them. Not just into a general public purse to be spent where no contribution was made.
  • Where possible align any taxation to a ‘user pays’ system, so those not using a service or product aren’t liable to be funding something they don’t use.
  • Review the tax exemption status of religious organisations and their business with the view of introducing an appropriate taxation.
  • To prohibit and prosecute tax evasion schemes and tax haven activity that robs the Australian people of between $6-20 Billion in valuable revenue for public spending in our country. This public money could be spent on health, education, infrastructure, aged care/pensions and many other public benefits.
  • Work to reduce the tax burden on the Australian public in general by reducing having taxes just for the sake of an opportunity to collect a tax. Tax should only be imposed where their is a demonstrated need to publicly fund that area and only taxed to the extent to fund it.
  • Ensure the income taxation system is reviewed and  redesigned so the many (average hard-working Australian) don’t pay more than they can afford and large corporations and wealthy individuals contribute more, according to their income. At present it is mostly the wealthy that avoid paying their fair share with the many low-medium  income earners pay the overall lion’s share. The debate needs to have ‘independent’ experts closely examine the pros and cons of all the Progressive, Flat, and Fair (GST) taxation systems and include safety nets for the poor and ceilings for the very high profit earners.
Banking & Finance
  • The banking royal commission was only called because the LNP government had their hand forced by public pressure and the loss of their majority numbers at that time. Prior to that they fought hard against having one many times.
    When forced into it they called a ‘mini’ one that didn’t go far enough. There needs be more and deeper public and legal scrutiny into other sectors of the financial industries, including the debt acquisitions and liquidations areas.
  • I endorse legislation enactment similar to the Glass-Steagall Act in the US that forced banks to keep separate commercial investment funds from customers personal savings, thus offering protection to people who entrust their savings to commercial banks. As it is now in many countries’ banks (in times of financial ‘stress’), can use personal funds to prop up their commercial interests and actual legally lose all their money.
Public Spending
  • Prioritise spending of our public funds (our tax dollars) to areas that benefit most Australian people and the future of us as a sovereign country. Areas such as health, education, public infrastructure, elderly & child welfare need more support, not cutbacks. Our rural, agricultural and essential food production industries are a high priority for support in difficult times.
  • Ensure that all foreign spending and financial support is limited only to the extent of what is necessary, affordable and in the interests of the Australian public. To make available to the Australian public auditable details and money trails of foreign spending, to show it is actually achieving worthy results. It is often the case that much of the Billions we send overseas in foreign aid doesn’t make it to the actual people that need it.
  • Invest in cleaner, sustainable & reliable energy sources. Coal and gas are important resource for our country right now and some time into the future, though we must start to transition to renewable energy sources right now. This transition needs to mange the inevitable employment reductions in the coal sector with increased opportunities in new energy industries, so as to avoid families left with out income opportunities.  If we stopped virtually giving our energy resources like gas away to overseas companies, these would be far cheaper for Australians.
  •  Ensure that Australia’s citizens’ health, well-being and financial status are adequately met as a primary consideration before setting and reviewing foreign spending.
    We should not have homeless people in Australia while we are sending Billions overseas in foreign aid.
Immigration
  • We need to continually monitor and set our immigration levels against the population needs of Australia and the current and predicted available infrastructure. Our intake of immigrants should not exceed a level that fulfils our skills requirement, financial limitations, or infrastructure that can easily cater for this increase in population.
  • We must assess and prioritise immigration based on the applicants skills and abilities to contribute tangible value to our existing and future success and prosperity. People wishing to live in our country must make the adjustments to our way of life and not impose their different religious or ethnic views on existing Australians with the expectation that we change our culture to suit them.
  • After colonial settlement Australia has been traditionally a Christian-based country and although freedom of other religious beliefs is accepted and welcomed, it should not be at the expense or forfeiture of the existing and Australian traditional Christian customs or observations. All religions should accept that others have have certain traditions and allow these observations equally, as long as they do not have any harmful intent to other people.
  • I endorse a regulated limited annual ceiling on genuine refugees that request asylum in Australia based on genuine humanitarian reasons. Our border protection against illegal refugees is very important. All refugees need to be heavily vetted to prove they are  genuine and not a risk to Australia or our citizens. They must agree to be settled in areas where work prospects are high and and be not given permanent status until they have proved they have assimilated as a productive member of our society over a number of years.
  •  Immigrants and refugees must pledge to assimilate into our cultural way of life and society and not expect that existing Australian citizens to change our culture, customs and laws to accommodate them.
  • Since colonial settlement, Australia has greatly benefited from the culinary  variety that immigrants have exposed it’s people to. Not withstanding this, immigrant with religious restrictions on food types or sources, should not impose their requirements on existing Australian citizens, or our public schools, or work environment. Instead, as willing migrants to our country they should make adjustments and arrangements to satisfy their particular food choices.
Protection of Constitutional and Civil Rights
  • Ensure the common law and civil rights of the people of Australia are protected and not able to be removed or diminished by those in political or judicial power.
  • Should the Australian people eventually vote to become a republic, our existing Constitution of the Australian Commonwealth, should be strengthened into a Bill Of Rights style document (that the citizens of Australia have input into and agree upon), and that it enshrines common law, civil rights and freedoms of the Australian people, that can only be subsequently changed by the will of the people at a referendum. This document should start with the premise that all  citizens have all freedoms to go about their personal lives and commercial trade activities without hindrance, as long as the intention or result is not to cause harm or ill-will to others.
    It must be enshrined that the citizens of Australia do have the ultimate control over it’s government and a mechanism to assert this control by majority vote.
  • To ensure the Constitution of the Australian Commonwealth (i.e. The Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act) is adhered to from both a legal and moral sense.
  • To ensure all Federal and State laws are reviewed to assess compliance both legally and morally to the Constitution of the Australian Commonwealth (i.e. The Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act).
Sale of Australian land, Infrastructure & Assets
  • Ensure all Australian rural/agriculture land, infrastructure and significant assets stay in the majority hands of Australian citizens or Australian owned companies. No more than 40% share of any single item of these to be owned my foreign interests.
  • Keep current accurate records of all Australian land, infrastructure and asset sales that involve foreign investment and monitor and investigate to ensure strict compliance to these requirements.
  • No critical infrastructure or assets like water, energy, telecommunications, military and national security etc. should be owned by companies with foreign shareholders.
  • More support for Australian-owned manufacturing business must be given to create and support local jobs and economies.
  • Instead of public-owned assets and infrastructure being sold off (for a quick political gain), the peoples’ tax money should be used to retain and buy these important utilities so costs and profits can be managed in the best interests of the Australian people.
Foreign Affairs
  •  Government should conduct it’s political affairs with more focus on it’s own Australian citizens and less influence from multinational corporations and pressure from foreign government sources.
  •  All trading with foreign countries must be conducted on a mutual benefit basis. All trade deals with other countries must be transparent and the details made available for public scrutiny. No trade pacts should allow any company or foreign government to sue or hold the Australian government or people liable (e.g. TPP)
  • Ensure that all foreign aid and financial support is limited only to the extent of what is necessary, affordable and in the interests of humanitarian needs.  To make available to the Australian public auditable details and money trails of foreign aid, to show it is actually achieving intended and worthy results.
  •  Australia should review it’s role and financing to the United Nations and to ensure the dominant, influential members are actually focused more on genuine peace initiatives and actions around the world, not overtly controlling other sovereign nations and their right to make civil and financial decisions that are in the interest of their own country.
  •  Australia should not support or be involved in foreign conflicts that do not need our involvement, or have not been fully and independently investigated as to the nature, cause, national benefit and international implications. Australia should not be drawn into or involved in international conflict or affairs of other sovereign countries, just on the allegations or request from other foreign powers.
  •  We should review the Australian government’s signing of the Lima Declaration in 1975 (that called for the redistribution of world industry so that developing countries would have 25% of it by the year 2000) and the effect it has had on Australian industries, manufacturing, rural exports and Australian jobs. Basically, we signed up to sell our resource cheaply, manufacture and export less and to import more. It also encouraged the transfer of ‘loans’ to developing countries, into ‘grants’ to them.
Cease Political Benefits After Leaving The Job
  •  To review benefits and perks that ex-politicians receive after they finish serving in an official government capacity. Everyday Australians don’t continue to get any benefits of their employment once their employment ceases, so they should not be expected to financially support politicians once their role finishes.
  • To review benefits and perks that serving politicians receive while they are acting in their elected capacity. I don’t believe the Australian public expect to pay for politicians activities or expenses beyond they actual expenses incurred to do their work. Exorbitant allowances beyond what is reasonable must be ceased.
Firearm Control
  • Australia has some of the most robust gun and weapons control legislation in the world. There is no evidence that the general public is at risk from people that own a firearm under this existing legislation. There is a requirement to stop  weapons from being owned or possessed by criminals, or the criminally intent. It is also necessary to protect the rights of sound-minded, law-abiding citizens to possess firearms for valid purposes. I will strive to ensure that both of these requirements are achieved and that any firearm/weapons legislation does not decrease public safety, nor violate the civil rights of law-abiding citizens.
  • Ensure that proper representation to any government firearms and weapons policy working and advisory groups, by all those with a valid interest in the controlling legislation.
  • Ensure that legislative decisions made are based only on valid research, historical evidence and statistics and not tainted or influenced by emotional fears.
  • Ensure that the illegal importation of weapons and weapon parts are stopped, to limit the possession of weapons by criminally intent people.
Police Department To Focus On Serve & Protect
  •  The role of the Commonwealth and State police should be to serve and protect the citizens of Australia. They should not be used as a tool for revenue-raising for the government, as they are now. Any arrest, revenue or infringement targets should be abolished.
  •  The powers of the police must be balanced with the requirement for individual civil rights and freedoms. Citizens must be able to go about their daily business without interference, unless there is reasonable evidence that a law has been broken. The presumption of innocence must be maintained in the public arena until actual evidence indicates otherwise.
  •  All complaints of misconduct within the police department must be conducted by an external, independent and unbiased body.
  • The police force should not be ‘militarised’ in appearance or function, rather promote the intent to be a civil service that works with and within the community to serve and protect them and their property.
  • The unwarranted use or over-use of terror-related reasons to disregard civil rights and freedoms must be prevented. There is a significant push by governments around the world to over-exaggerate the threat of terrorist-related risk to the general population, in order to increase the controlling power of the government and remove the civil rights and privacy of the citizens.
Military Deployment
  • There is a need to review Australia’s military involvement in conflicts overseas and the unquestioning alliance and subservience to other countries military requests. There is plenty of hard evidence that many major overseas military conflicts and humanitarian  ‘interventions?’ were at best not necessary and at worst were based on lies and faked evidence and reports.
  • Review the appropriateness of having a new investigative & advisory group consisting of not only military and foreign intelligence representatives, also representatives from a dedicated Senate committee and key civil rights advocate groups. I believe it is desirable to get a broader perspective of what the Australian public’s Will would be to military deployment on a case-by-case basis, than just what Defense Minister and Military chiefs of the day may have.
  • As has (and is) happening in other countries, the often exaggerated and at times contrived threat of terror attacks, has led to government using their military to police and control their own citizens’ domestic activity. This should not be allowed to happen in Australia. Our military should never be used against, or to control peaceful protest by it’s own people. If there is mass violence and mass lawlessness, beyond what the civil police force can manage, then I see a case to support the police only to the extent as to prevent harm to them or other civilians, not to be used as aggressors. If there is a significant enough level of violent unrest among the population (that the government thinks the military is needed to intervene), then the government is out of touch with the Will of the people and needs to be replaced. The citizens of Australia must always be in control of their government… not the other way around.
The Legal System & Access Affordable Justice
  •  To ensure all laws, courts and legal jurisdictions within States of the Commonwealth of Australia, strictly adhere to the overarching Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act 1900 and any legally valid amendments to it passed by a referendum of the Australian people.
  •  To ensure that all court officials and juries treat people brought before them with the presumption of innocence and let only the established facts and legitimate evidence prove if they are guilty of an offence.
  • To ensure that all citizens receive fair and just treatment in all legal jurisdictions and that no citizen will be denied quality legal representation should they ask for it. The ability to seek and achieve justice should not depend on a person’s financial status.
  • To preserve a judicial system where Common Law and ‘natural justice’ prevail to deliver what common citizens would perceive as natural justice.
Environmental Concerns
  •  Climate change is inevitable and it has been happening continuously in many and varied cyclical patterns since the planet was formed 4.5 billion years ago. However, scientific data shows no climate cycle is found to be perfectly periodic. Regardless, there is a strong scientific consensus that at the moment the earth is (or should be) continuing in a cooling phase. The reported abnormality of global warming over the later years (after our comparatively brief human existence), has been attributed by many as human-caused due to our industrialisation and deforestation of our planet. Other scientists provide explanations to suggest any variances in the cycles are natural, have regularly happened within larger cycles and not due to human activity. Its a ‘rabbit hole’ of scientific data when you really dive into it.
    Unfortunately there are now many influential people on both sides of the debate with huge financial incentives to push real and ‘manufactured data’ to promote their stance.
    Regardless of which side of the debate you support, I endorse that all human activity on our planet, be it through mining, industrial or agriculture practices, should be managed in a way, that at best prevents, or worst restricts any damage to the health of our environment. It makes good sense to me that humanity and our planet benefits from restricting human-created pollutants from entering our atmosphere, land and fresh and ocean waters, therefore we should take all reasonable step to ensure they don’t.
  • I believe we have enough land already cleared to support our agricultural and industrial needs, without having to deforest or clear more significantly important natural vegetation areas. We need to reduce wastage that contributes to losses in the food chain and at the consumer end. Existing land cleared for primary production, agriculture, grazing or industry should be managed in a way that does not further negatively impact on the health and viability of our environment. Clearing of regrowth from existing farm land can be managed in a way that sustains both production and environmental health.
  • We need to invest more in clean, sustainable & reliable energy sources. Coal and gas (fossil fuels) are still important energy and income resources for our country now and for a short time into the future, though we must start to transition to renewable/sustainable/alternate energy sources right now. There are many alternate clean energy producing technologies known to us now (but held back), that can utilise natural, electro-magnetic and mechanical engineered resources, that could eventually replace all our fossil fuel reliance, if proper support and incentives were provided now. I would encourage people to look at Molten Salt Reactors as one example of safe, cheap, scaleable, reliable energy generation sources (https://www.zmescience.com/ecology/what-is-molten-salt-reactor-424343/). Currently the mining and resource sector supports many jobs (both physical and in business), so the transitioning of those jobs to new cleaner energy industries and environmentally-friendly resource work practices needs to start now. Given the technology the world has available right now and the rapid global push to new energy sources, I do not believe we have a need for any new fossil fuel mines.
Cashless Welfare Debit Card
  • Yes, it is unacceptable if welfare recipients are spending their welfare payments on gambling, alcohol, drugs (or anything else for that matter), at the expense of their or their family’s health and well-being. Welfare payments (that are funded by working taxpayers) are a safety-net to provide a basic living support for individuals and families. Those taxpayers working hard to provide for themselves and family are rightfully upset if the tax they pay is supporting someone’s gambling or recreational drug/alcohol use, especially if it is at the expense of a family’s well-being.
    Even so, is the problem so bad that the government has to tar every welfare recipient with the same brush? There is a shame that people on welfare (who are genuinely trying to find work), feel and most of these are living on the bare bones and going without things themselves so their children can have their well-being and education needs met. Stigmatising these people further by including them on this card system has only a negative effect.
  • I have read reports from major charity organisations like St Vincents stating ‘There is no evidence that it improves the wellbeing of individuals or communities, either by reducing substance abuse or by increasing employment outcomes. The cashless debit card also carries a high risk of unintended and expensive consequences across government and the community, including social exclusion and stigmatisation, increased financial hardship, and the erosion of individual autonomy and dignity. Ultimately, this is a punitive and paternalistic measure that is driven by ideology rather than evidence.’
    In addition, Australian National University researchers have criticised the reliability of a government-commissioned study used to justify the cashless debit card’s expansion. ANU researchers say its ‘unwise’ to place too much stock in evaluation which found card was effective ‘in reducing alcohol consumption, illegal drug use and gambling’.
  • Perhaps there is a better way to manage the concern (that a minority of welfare recipients are inappropriately spending their support payment), than the many millions it has taken to conduct trials and will be to rollout and manage this welfare card system. Why can’t there be a better reporting and investigation system that targets only those strongly suspected of wrongdoing and mange those individuals through the existing child/family welfare systems? In cases where there is systemic or ongoing misuse of support then perhaps a similar card be issued only in those cases. This way the majority of people doing the right thing maintain their dignity and freedom to make the purchases for their families they see fit.

  • After considering the pros and cons that I am aware of for the Welfare Debit Card system, I do not support its general rollout and use. I do not believe the benefits that may be achieved in the minority of cases, outweigh the negative social and financial impacts of a general rollout. Its inception appears to be somewhat politically motivated and yet another way for government to dictate to the citizens of Australia how to live their daily lives.
    Additionally, the Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act, Part V, 51 (xxiiiA) gives the power to parliament to legislate for benefits/allowances, including unemployment ‘(but not so as to authorize any form of civil conscription)’. This could be determined that welfare recipients have to conscribe to this card system to receive their payment, thus making it unconstitutional.
Aged Care and Pension
  • It is a measure of the moral integrity and decency of a society by how they care for their elderly. I’m afraid we have come up short in this regard. There are some horrific stories coming to light now the Aged Care Royal Commission is under way. It has been reported that there were nearly 3,800 assaults in Australian nursing homes in the past financial year. There have been far more incidents and concerns where poor treatment and substandard care has occurred. In general the elderly are vulnerable members of our society and any abuse or mistreatment cannot be tolerated.
    There are no federal staffing laws in aged care facilities.
    Australian aged care facilities are not legally required to have even one Registered Nurse on site at any time. Qld and Australian nurses are campaigning to see this changed.

  • Unfortunately, as with most sectors that governments over the years have sold off or farmed out to private enterprise, company profits often take a higher priority than people. Once when a lot of public services were provided by governments, profits weren’t the driving force. Providing services to the taxpayers was, as we were basically paying our taxes to get these public services in return. At least we could see something tangible for the taxes we were paying. Not forgetting to mention, these government services were a big employer of people in those communities. Our taxes were helping to provide jobs and sustain people in the community. The government sell-out spin we were sold was deregulation and privatising assets and services would drive prices down due to competition. Despite time and time again that just the opposite has happened (due to increased company profit taking). It was nothing more than a cash grab by successive political Parties to make their books look good. Having these (now private service industries) administer and self-regulate themselves also lead to reduced service standards as profits came before people. Also jobs in the communities dried up as private companies didn’t make enough profit for their liking in regional areas.
  • The governments have got it backwards for years. With public service industries (like health and aged care) we need better government oversite and regulatory control and less regulation on telling individuals in Australia how to go about their daily lives. Instead they are letting big business dictate terms and reap huge profits from the average hard working taxpayer and forcing these same taxpayers to financial hardships they can hardly cope with (private health insurance is but one of them). I endorse more government involvement and control over the health and aged care industries. If successive governing political Parties had the guts to gather the billions of dollars in multinational corporate taxes our country would have enough money to properly support all these service industries, be an employer more people, and balance our books.
    There needs to be a greater emphasis on thorough academic and skills-based training for staff in aged care to cater for all the types of conditions and ailments that commonly occur in the elderly. Introducing safe staffing laws to aged care would bring it into line with other industries in Australia such as child care. The QNMU is also part of a national campaign to introduce legislated ratios.

  • Also our aged pensioners have been very poorly done by for decades, many struggling to provide a decent standard of living for themselves, in what should be a relaxing retirement. Australia used to have a separate pension fund (National Welfare Fund) used only for that purpose, that workers all paid tax directly into during their working lives. It had 100’s of Millions in it to fund the old age pension. Some decades ago successive governments took it all out and put it into general revenue and now say we don’t have any more money for pensioners. Aged pensioners have been ripped off by both the major Parties.

    As the federal representative of the people of Hinkler I will be relentless in my pursuit of real changes in the aged care sector, to make high quality care affordable to all elderly people, not the wealthy as it mainly is now. Also to ensure our aged pensioners are paid a proper living pension.

Regional Employment
  • Hinkler, like many regional electorates, has an ongoing battle with unemployment. In fact from the report I saw it has the highest unemployment stats in Queensland. There aren’t enough permanent or casual jobs for the people looking for them. There is always the desire to attract new industries to the region and bolster existing ones. The steadfast horticulture/agriculture, sugar, manufacturing, building, fishing and tourism industries in the area are now being increasingly supplemented by health care and aged/disability care services. The commonwealth and state governments along with regional councils also employ many people throughout the region.

  • This is where governments and local councils used to support regional communities more than they do now. Years ago, before both Commonwealth and State governments started down the path of selling off and privatising government-owned assets, many people in local towns and communities were employed by government or local councils. Young kids often got trade apprenticeships or office jobs with these employers straight out of school and continued in these careers most of their lives. It was taxpayers’ money going back into the communities it was generated from, in a supportive cycle. Now, after the attempt to cut government expenditure (to sell to the voters how good the books looked), by selling off and privatising these jobs, a lot of these jobs have gone. Private companies run to maximise profit for their owners or shareholders and if it isn’t profitable enough they won’t continue in that area. Public assets, services and employment that could be run at a break-even, or even slight loss under a government (because it was public money spent in the community for the public service), was not now attractive to the profit-driven private enterprises. The flow-on consequences are if the service is required in the area the people have to pay extra for it to sustain the profit viability to the company.
  • The government has been pushing ‘trickle down’ economics where they give huge tax breaks to large companies telling us that will flow on to create more jobs. I agree with some experts in that in reality this rarely happens and most big companies just increase their profit margin. To increase jobs we should be giving very specific and monitored financial incentives to both large and small business, which can only be gained when new full-time jobs are actually created.
    Also the government needs to stop disguising the unemployment problem by including part-time and casual employees in the ‘employed’ stats. Many of these are under-employed and desperately looking for full-time work. True employment stats should show all these categories.

  • Apart from government incentives to drive expansion of new and existing industries, I endorse government-owned or sponsored services that create jobs in the region. Colleges like TAFE that train young and old people in trades and real-world jobs need support to provide affordable training in the region. These local institutions themselves provide jobs in the region.
    Also provide financial incentives for small business  employers that get delivered when actual full-time jobs get created.

Medicinal Cannabis
  • Cannabis is a natural plant that has been used for medicine by people in many countries around the world for many thousands of years. It was not only grown for that purpose in the US early last century, it was actively promoted by the government and doctors to do so. There is just so much scientific and anecdotal evidence (over centuries) that confirms it’s ‘safe’ medicinal use, unlike many of the ‘legal’ pharmaceutical drugs being pushed for huge profits these days, that kill many thousands of people around the world each year and addict many more. To my understanding there has not been one death directly attributed to cannabis use.

  • It wasn’t until big pharma and alcohol industries got their hooks into corrupt politicians that it became illegal and then bumped right up to heroin status; what a joke.

    Now they want to keep (what could be easily grown and extracted by individuals themselves freely) illegal, so governments and big pharma can sink their profit hooks into it. All the while sick adults and children suffer, or have to pay a premium price for something that could (and should) be free.

  • Personally I don’t take any drugs or use alcohol, though I will be actively supporting moves to legislate that the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes be freely allowed. Also as I believe the use and addiction to alcohol and pharmaceutical drugs causes infinitely more harm to individuals and society than cannabis, I will support the decriminalisation of small amounts of cannabis for recreational use.
    Regulations will still exist with regards to ‘driving under the influence’ similar to alcohol.

  • It has been shown in other forward-thinking countries around the world that decriminalising soft recreational drugs has a positive effect on societies including decreased crime rates, decreased incarcerations, freeing up police resources so they can focus on real crimes against people, and decreased addictions to pharmaceutical and other hard drugs.

Health and Medicine
  • The health of Australia’s citizens is not an issue where the level of care and financing should be determined by what money the federal and State governments think they can spare to fund it. It should be one of the highest priorities within their budgets and money allocated to fully fund proper health care for every citizen. Good health care should not just be for those that can afford it.

  • Australia’s health system and medical ‘industry’ should not be governed or dictated to by the pharmaceutical industry organisations and lobby groups, rather a large board of vetted independent experts from a range of health fields and disciplines, including scientific and alternate natural fields. We need to ensure all avenues and options to promote health are available to the public to choose from. The ultimate right to choose how to care for one’s body should always remain with the individual and never be forces or dictated.

  • All drugs, medicines, vaccines and other artificiality created substances commercially made to treat people, should be independently trialled and tested to be safe for people to use. If people choose to use naturally occurring medicinal substances for personal health care reasons, then this should be there prerogative.

  • I do not believe any  person has the right to force another person to take or inject into their body any substance they do not wish to have. The right to choose and control what a person puts in their body must always remain with the individual and there should be no mandating, intimidation or coercion to do so against their wishes. This is a basic human right that no government has the right to remove.

Preferencing & Voting in Parliament
  • Preferencing statement

    I’m not preferencing at all. To me, that should be a personal choice of the individual.

    On the House of Reps ballot paper voters have to number ALL the candidates in the order of their preference, otherwise their vote is classed as informal and does not get counted at all. It is only the numbering on the actual voter ballot paper that factors in determining the candidate that wins the seat. Candidates and Parties can not allocate who gets your preferences, only suggest how you vote. That is why political Parties hand out ‘how-to-vote’ cards at polling booths. To get their supporters to preference the other candidates they way that will suit the Party’s chances best.

    If voters of this electorate are interested enough, I believe they have the intelligence to reject what the Parties ‘how-to-vote’ cards tell them, and make their own minds up in what order they would like the candidates to be their representative. You will not see me or anyone supporting me handing out how-to-vote cards. Not only are they an expense that I can’t afford, and need an army people to hand them out, the disinterested don’t take them and only the Party sheep follow them. I am verbally suggesting to those that ask, if they like what I am standing for, (and actually what some real integrity in parliament), then please put me #1 on the HoRs ballot paper. If they dislike another candidate or Parties the most then they should put them last… and so it goes until all the boxes are numbered. On mine I will be putting the major Parties last as they have stopped caring about the average person long ago.

    Maybe naive some may say… well I’d rather be that and have my honesty and integrity intact, then spend money on political war games telling fair-minded people what to think of other candidates. On my ballot paper I will be putting the major Parties last, as I believe they have long had only their own interests at heart and only feign interest for the average Australian at election time.

  • Voting in Parliament

    I can assure you, like I have mentioned to other post commenters on my Facebook Page, I am a genuine Independent and not aligned to any other Party or organisation. If elected I will vote for any Bill, legislation or amendment that is genuinely going to benefit my electorate and/or the average people of Australia, no matter which Party or individual puts it forward. Conversely, oppose any proposal that is not. That is the value of a true Independent. They can vote based on merit, not get told what to do by Party bosses or political donors. I will not be bullied or goaded into supporting legislation or proposals that do not benefit the average Australian.

More Objectives To Be Added Below

Next objective to be added
  •  
  •  
Like what you read? Please help the cause by sharing with your friends!
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email

4 thoughts on “Political Objectives”

    1. Preferencing statement

      I’m not preferencing at all. To me, that should be a personal choice of the individual.
      On the House of Reps ballot paper voters have to number ALL the candidates in the order of their preference, otherwise their vote is classed as informal and does not get counted at all. It is only the numbering on the actual voter ballot paper that factors in determining the candidate that wins the seat.
      That is why political Parties hand out ‘how-to-vote’ cards at polling booths. To get their supporters to preference the other candidates they way that will suit the Party’s chances best.

      If voters of this electorate are interested enough, I believe they have the intelligence to reject what the Parties ‘how-to-vote’ cards tell them, and make their own minds up in what order they would like the candidates to be their representative. You will not see me or anyone supporting me handing out how-to-vote cards. Not only are they an expense that I can’t afford, and need an army people to hand them out, the disinterested don’t take them and only the Party sheep follow them. I am verbally suggesting to those that ask. if they like what I am standing for, (and actually what some real integrity in parliament), then please put me first on the HoRs ballot paper. If they dislike another candidate or Parties the most then they should put them last… and so it goes.
      Maybe naive some may say… well I’d rather be that and have my honesty and integrity intact, then spend money on political war games telling fair-minded people what to think of other candidates. On my ballot paper I will be putting the major Parties last, as I believe they have long had only their own interests at heart and only feign interest for the average Australian at election time.

      Voting in Parliament

      I can assure you, like I have mentioned to other post commenters on my Facebook Page, I am a genuine Independent and not aligned to any other Party or organisation. If elected I will vote for any Bill, legislation or amendment that is genuinely going to benefit my electorate and/or the average people of Australia, no matter which Party or individual puts it forward. Conversely, oppose any proposal that is not. That is the value of a true Independent. They can vote based on merit, not get told what to do by Party bosses or political donors.

  1. Without the Australian Military the Olympic and Commonwealth Games may have been a failure! Australian Military support the Australian People in drought, floods, cyclones, terror attacks, assist with police enforcement, fire and should be used under civil police control during civil unrest.

    1. It hinges on what your definition of ‘unrest’ is. If there is mass violence and mass lawlessness, beyond what the civil police force can manage, then I see a case to support the police only to the extent as to prevent harm to them or other civilians, not to be used as aggressors. I disagree that any military should be used against it’s own citizens in civil protests. There should always be a separation between civil police forces and armed military forces. When governments have the power and inclination to use our military against us, we no longer have a democracy but an authoritarian dictatorship. If civil protest gets to the level that a government feels it needs to use the military against it’s citizens, then the government has failed it’s people and needs replacing.

      I agree the military can and should be used in peaceful purpose in emergency situations to support our country’s people (and others if required), in times of natural disasters and other humanitarian purposes.

Please leave a Comment or Question

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top